Binbrook Dentistry
Services
 





DIGITAL X-RAYS Minimize

Digital radiograph's are one of the newest X-ray techniques around! The X-rays hit the pad the same way they hit the film. But instead of developing the film in a dark room, the image is electronically sent directly to a computer where the image is store in screen. The image can then be stored on the computer or printed out. This means that tiny problems that may not be seen with the naked eye can be caught earlier and more clearly with digital radiography!
  
FILLINGS Minimize

Your dentist may use several methods to determine if you have tooth decay including:
  • Observation — Some discolored spots on your teeth may indicate decay, but not all of them. Your dentist may use an explorer, a metal instrument with a sharp tip, to probe for possible decay. Healthy tooth enamel is hard and will resist pressure by the explorer. Decayed enamel is softer. The instrument will stick in it slightly. Explorers must be used with caution. Pressing too hard with an explorer can damage a healthy tooth.
  • Cavity-detecting dye — This can be rinsed over your tooth. It will stick to decayed areas and rinse cleanly from healthy ones.
  • X-rays — X-rays can help your dentist see decay that doesn't show on the surface. However, X-rays are often not accurate in detecting smaller cavities on occlusal (top) surfaces. Current fillings or other restorations also may block the view of decay.   
Decay is not the only reason you may need a filling. Other reasons include:
  • Cracked or broken teeth
  • Teeth that are worn from unusual use, such as:
  • Nail-biting
  • Tooth grinding (bruxism)
  • Using your teeth to open things
  
FLUORIDE Minimize

What is Fluoride?

Fluoride is a natural mineral found throughout the earth's crust and widely distributed in nature. Some foods and water supplies contain fluoride.

Fluoride is often added to drinking water to help reduce tooth decay. In the 1930s, researchers found that people who grew up drinking naturally fluoridated water had up to two-thirds fewer cavities than people living in areas without fluoridated water. Studies since then have repeatedly shown that when fluoride is added to a community's water supply, tooth decay decreases. The American Dental Association, the World Health Organization and the American Medical Association, among many other organizations, have endorsed the use of fluoride in water supplies because of its effect on tooth decay.

How Does Fluoride Work?

Fluoride helps prevent cavities in two different ways:
  • Fluoride concentrates in the growing bones and developing teeth of children, helping to harden the enamel on baby and adult teeth before they emerge
  • Fluoride helps to harden the enamel on adult teeth that have already emerged
Fluoride works during the demineralization and remineralization processes that naturally occur in your mouth. After you eat, your saliva contains acids that cause demineralization a dissolving of the calcium and phosphorous under the tooth's surface.

At other times when your saliva is less acidic it does just the opposite, replenishing the calcium and phosphorous that keep your teeth hard. This process is caused remineralization. When fluoride is present during remineralization, the minerals deposited are harder than they would otherwise be, helping to strengthen your teeth and prevent dissolution during the next demineralization phase.

How do I Know if I'm Getting Enough Fluoride?

If your drinking water is fluoridated, then brushing regularly with fluoride toothpaste is considered sufficient for adults and children with healthy teeth at low risk of decay.

If your community's water is not fluoridated and does not have enough natural fluoride in it (1 part per million is considered optimal), then your dentist or pediatrician may prescribe fluoride tablets or drops for your children to take daily. Your dentist or pediatrician can tell you how much fluoride is right for your family, so be sure to ask for his or her advice.

If your water comes from a public water supply, you can find out if it's fluoridated by calling your local water district. If your water comes from a private well, you can have it analyzed by an independent environmental testing company that provides water-testing services.
  
CROWNS/BRIDGES Minimize

What are Dental Crowns and Tooth Bridges?

Both crowns and most bridges are fixed prosthetic devices. Unlike removable devices such as dentures, which you can take out and clean daily, crowns and bridges are cemented onto existing teeth or implants, and can only be removed by a dentist.

How do Crowns Work?

A crown is used to entirely cover or "cap" a damaged tooth. Besides strengthening a damaged tooth, a crown can be used to improve its appearance, shape or alignment. A crown can also be placed on top of an implant to provide a tooth-like shape and structure for function. Porcelain or ceramic crowns can be matched to the color of your natural teeth. Other materials include gold and metal alloys, acrylic and ceramic. These alloys are generally stronger than porcelain and may be recommended for back teeth. Porcelain bonded to a metal shell is often used because it is both strong and attractive.

Your dentist may recommend a crown to:
  • Replace a large filling when there isn't enough tooth remaining
  • Protect a weak tooth from fracturing
  • Restore a fractured tooth
  • Attach a bridge
  • Cover a dental implant
  • Cover a discolored or poorly shaped tooth
  • Cover a tooth that has had root canal treatment

How do Bridges Work?

A bridge may be recommended if you're missing one or more teeth. Gaps left by missing teeth eventually cause the remaining teeth to rotate or shift into the empty spaces, resulting in a bad bite. The imbalance caused by missing teeth can also lead to gum disease and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders.

Bridges are commonly used to replace one or more missing teeth. They span the space where the teeth are missing. Bridges are cemented to the natural teeth or implants surrounding the empty space. These teeth, called abutments, serve as anchors for the bridge. A replacement tooth, called a pontic, is attached to the crowns that cover the abutments. As with crowns, you have a choice of materials for bridges. Your dentist can help you decide which to use, based on the location of the missing tooth (or teeth), its function, aesthetic considerations and cost. Porcelain or ceramic bridges can be matched to the color of your natural teeth.

How are Crowns and Bridges Made?

Before either a crown or a bridge can be made, the tooth (or teeth) must be reduced in size so that the crown or bridge will fit over it properly. After reducing the tooth/teeth, your dentist will take an impression to provide an exact mold for the crown or bridge. If porcelain is to be used, your dentist will determine the correct shade for the crown or bridge to match the color of your existing teeth.

Using this impression, a dental lab then makes your crown or bridge, in the material your dentist specifies. A temporary crown or bridge will be put in place to cover the prepared tooth while the permanent crown or bridge is being made. When the permanent crown or bridge is ready, the temporary crown or bridge is removed, and the new crown or bridge is cemented over your prepared tooth or teeth.

How Long do Crowns and Bridges Last?

While crowns and bridges can last a lifetime, they do sometimes come loose or fall out. The most important step you can take to ensure the longevity of your crown or bridge is to practice good oral hygiene. A bridge can lose its support if the teeth or bone holding it in place are damaged by dental disease. Keep your gums and teeth healthy by Brushing with fluoride toothpaste twice a day and flossing daily. Also see your dentist and hygienist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings.

To prevent damage to your new crown or bridge, avoid chewing hard foods, ice or other hard objects.

Crowns
Bridges
Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook   Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook   Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook   Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook
  Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook
Full porcelain fused to metal.

Full cast gold crown.

Teeth around the space are prepared.

The bridge is mounted and adjusted for fit and comfort.

The bridge is cemented into position.
  
ROOT CANAL Minimize

A dentist uses root canal treatment to find the cause of and then treat problems related to the tooth's soft core, the dental pulp. In the past, teeth with diseased or injured pulps often were removed. Today, root canal treatment has given dentists a safe way of saving teeth.

The pulp is the soft tissue that contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. It lies within the tooth and extends from the crown of the tooth to the tip of the root in the bone of the jaw.

When the pulp is diseased or injured and cannot repair itself, it dies. The most common cause of pulp death is a cracked tooth or a deep cavity. Both of these problems can let bacteria enter the pulp, causing an infection inside the tooth.

Left without treatment, pus builds up at the root tip in the jawbone forming a "pus-pocket" called an abscess. An abscess can cause damage to the bone around the teeth. When the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result. Certain byproducts of the infection can injure the jaw bones. Without treatment, your tooth may have to be removed.

Root canal treatment often involves from one to three visits. During treatment, a general dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in problems of the pulp) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed.

A restored tooth can last a lifetime if you continue to care for your teeth and gums. However, regular checkups are necessary. As long as the root of a treated tooth is nourished by the tissues around it, your tooth will remain healthy.
  
TEETH REMOVAL Minimize

Why are Teeth Removed?

Teeth are extracted for a variety of reasons:
  • Decay has reached deep into the tooth
  • Infection has destroyed a large portion of the tooth or surrounding bone
  • There is not enough room for all the teeth in your mouth
Many dentists recommend extracting impacted teeth that are only partially erupted. Bacteria can enter around a partially erupted tooth and cause an infection, which can extend into the surrounding bone and become extremely serious. Impacted teeth continue trying to break through the gum tissue even if there is not enough room to accommodate them. The continued pressure caused by this attempted eruption can eventually damage the roots of nearby teeth. Removing a tooth that is impacted can often prevent infection, damage to adjacent teeth and bone, and save pain in the years to come.

How are Teeth Removed?

Before a tooth is removed, your dentist will thoroughly review your medical and dental history and take the appropriate X-rays.

X-rays reveal the length, shape, and position of the tooth and surrounding bone. From this information, your dentist can estimate the degree of difficulty of the procedure and decide whether to refer you to a specialist called an oral surgeon.

Before removal, the area around your tooth will be anesthetized. Dentists use a local anesthetic to numb the area of the mouth where the extraction will take place.

For a simple extraction, once the area is anesthetized, the tooth is loosened with the help of a tool called an elevator, then extracted with dental forceps. Your dentist may also want to smooth and recontour the underlying bone. When he or she is finished, they may choose to close the area with a stitch.

What can I Expect After an Extraction?
 
It is critical to keep the area clean and prevent infection immediately following the removal of a tooth. Your dentist will ask you to bite down gently on a piece of dry, sterile gauze, which you must keep in place for up to 30 to 45 minutes to limit bleeding while clotting takes place. For the next 24 hours, you shouldn't smoke, rinse your mouth vigorously, or clean the teeth next to the extraction site.
  
DENTAL IMPLANTS Minimize

What are Dental Implants?

Dental implants are metal posts or frames that are surgically positioned into the jawbone beneath your gums. Once in place, they allow your dentist to mount replacement teeth onto them.

How do Dental Implants Work?

Because implants fuse to your jawbone, they provide stable support for artificial teeth. Dentures and bridges mounted to implants won't slip or shift in your mouth — an especially important benefit when eating and speaking. This secure fit helps the dentures and bridges — as well as individual crowns placed over implants — feel more natural than conventional bridges or dentures.

For some people, ordinary bridges and dentures are simply not comfortable or even possible, due to sore spots, poor ridges or gagging. In addition, ordinary bridges must be attached to teeth on either side of the space left by the missing tooth. An advantage of implants is that no adjacent teeth need to be prepared or ground down to hold your new replacement tooth/teeth in place.

To receive implants, you need to have healthy gums and adequate bone to support the implant. You must also commit to keeping these structures healthy. Meticulous oral hygiene and regular dental visits are critical to the long-term success of dental implants.

Implants are usually more expensive than other methods of tooth replacement, and most insurance carriers typically cover less than 10 percent of the fees.

The American Dental Association considers two types of implants to be safe. They are:
Endosteal implants — these are surgically implanted directly into the jawbone. Once the surrounding gum tissue has healed, a second surgery is needed to connect a post to the original implant. Finally, an artificial tooth (or teeth) is attached to the post-individually, or grouped on a bridge or denture.

Subperiosteal implants — these consist of a metal frame that is fitted onto the jawbone just below the gum tissue. As the gums heal, the frame becomes fixed to the jawbone. Posts, which are attached to the frame, protrude through the gums. As with endosteal implants, artificial teeth are then mounted to the posts.

Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook   Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook   Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook   Binbrook Dentistry, Ontario, Binbrook
Posts are surgically placed below the gums.   Artificial teeth, grouped on a bridge, are mounted to the posts.   Implants offer a very stable and secure fit.   Implants serve as a base for single replacement teeth.
  



Binbrook Dentistry | 2665 Binbrook Rd. East Binbrook, ON | 905-667-1560  |  289-756-1710 | Fax: 289-286-0394

hvujovic@shaw.ca | www.binbrookdentistry.goldbook.ca